↑ top

Cinnamon Leaf

Cinnamomum zeylanicum

Cinnamon Leaf from Aromatics

Cinnamon Leaf

Cinnamomum zeylanicum

Description

Like clove, cinnamon leaf is a powerful local anesthetic and anti-inflammatory. Although fiery and hot, if used in small amounts (3-5 drops per oz of carrier) it can be safe on the skin and very effective for chronic inflammation. The oil smells beautifully of cinnamon and clove. 

For colds & flu prevention use at a 1% dilution, 5-6 drops per ounce of carrier oil or lotion. Combine with other oils such as Ravintsara, Pine, Sandalwood, Lavender and Ginger when a cold is coming on.

Cinnamon Leaf has a strong character and can be used to emotionally support someone who is feeling weak and in need of more energy. Its spicy, warm aroma lends itself to an uplifting effect when used in a blend. Use with caution as you would Clove Bud. Preliminary report posted.

Properties
Category
3 - Relieve
Aromas
Exotic and Sensual
Spicy
Sweet
Warm and Radiant
Woodsy
Notes
Middle
Chemical Families
Phenols
Therapeutic Properties
Analgesic
Antifungal
Antioxidant
Antirheumatic
Antispasmodic
Antiviral
Carminative
Immune support
Vasodilator
Country of Origin Madagascar
Cultivation Wildcrafted
Extraction Method Steam Distilled
Plant Part(s) Leaves
Botanical Family Lauraceae
Applications + Recipes

Emotional and Energetic Qualities

Warms mind and body
Fosters confidence
Promotes self-assurance

Recipes
Safety + Shelf Life

Suggested use is at 1% or less.  Cinnamon Leaf is high in a component called Eugenol, a Phenol. Phenols are considered to be the most irritating components to the skin and mucous membranes and can cause dermatitis and sensitization. If phenols are present in high concentrations in an essential oil, that oil should be used in very low dilutions on the skin (1% in a carrier) and for short periods of time. They are generally not safe for the skin in a bath. This oil should not be diffused or used in an inhaler. Phenol high oils are not used with babies and children. 

Robert Tisserand, in his book Essential Oil Safety, states that oils high in eugenol should be used with caution on those with impaired liver function.

Do not use eugenol high oils (like Cinnamon Leaf, Clove & Tulsi) with people who have clotting disorders, as eugenol is an anticoagulant.

The suggested shelf life is 3-4 years.

Batch History
Batch Number Distillation Date
CIL-104 Pre August 2017
CIL-103 Spring 2015
CIL-102 Summer 2013
CIL-101 Fall 2012

$7.00

Only 5 mL Available

Contact us for bulk pricing!

+ Size Guide

+ Wholesale Inquiries
Description

Like clove, cinnamon leaf is a powerful local anesthetic and anti-inflammatory. Although fiery and hot, if used in small amounts (3-5 drops per oz of carrier) it can be safe on the skin and very effective for chronic inflammation. The oil smells beautifully of cinnamon and clove. 

For colds & flu prevention use at a 1% dilution, 5-6 drops per ounce of carrier oil or lotion. Combine with other oils such as Ravintsara, Pine, Sandalwood, Lavender and Ginger when a cold is coming on.

Cinnamon Leaf has a strong character and can be used to emotionally support someone who is feeling weak and in need of more energy. Its spicy, warm aroma lends itself to an uplifting effect when used in a blend. Use with caution as you would Clove Bud. Preliminary report posted.

Properties
Category
3 - Relieve
Aromas
Exotic and Sensual
Spicy
Sweet
Warm and Radiant
Woodsy
Notes
Middle
Chemical Families
Phenols
Therapeutic Properties
Analgesic
Antifungal
Antioxidant
Antirheumatic
Antispasmodic
Antiviral
Carminative
Immune support
Vasodilator
Country of Origin Madagascar
Cultivation Wildcrafted
Extraction Method Steam Distilled
Plant Part(s) Leaves
Botanical Family Lauraceae
Applications + Recipes

Emotional and Energetic Qualities

Warms mind and body
Fosters confidence
Promotes self-assurance

Recipes
Safety + Shelf Life

Suggested use is at 1% or less.  Cinnamon Leaf is high in a component called Eugenol, a Phenol. Phenols are considered to be the most irritating components to the skin and mucous membranes and can cause dermatitis and sensitization. If phenols are present in high concentrations in an essential oil, that oil should be used in very low dilutions on the skin (1% in a carrier) and for short periods of time. They are generally not safe for the skin in a bath. This oil should not be diffused or used in an inhaler. Phenol high oils are not used with babies and children. 

Robert Tisserand, in his book Essential Oil Safety, states that oils high in eugenol should be used with caution on those with impaired liver function.

Do not use eugenol high oils (like Cinnamon Leaf, Clove & Tulsi) with people who have clotting disorders, as eugenol is an anticoagulant.

The suggested shelf life is 3-4 years.

Batch History
Batch Number Distillment Date
CIL-104 Pre August 2017
CIL-103 Spring 2015
CIL-102 Summer 2013
CIL-101 Fall 2012

Product Q&A


You must be logged in to leave a review. Please log in now.

Bottle Size Guide